Welcome to the TVStoreOnline TV and movie news blog. Here you'll find interviews with actors, screenwriters, producers, interesting facts, and behind-curtain looks at some of history's greatest films. You'll also find long, in-depth articles full of little-known facts and details. Whether you're a typical TV watcher/box office-goer or hardcore show or film critic, the TV Store Online blog has something for you.

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Arlen Roth

Any serious Bob Dylan fan will likely be able to tell you exactly what his favorite show was/is from the Rolling Thunder Revue of 1975-76, yet, there is one show that has escaped many Dylan fans from the tour: The October 23rd, 1975 dress-rehearsal which took place at Gerde's Folk City in New York the week prior to the tour kick-off on October 30th in Plymouth, Massachusetts.   While the dress-rehearsal show was recorded on film, only a few moments from that October 23rd show actually appear in the four-hour version of Dylan's 1978 movie highlighting the tour, RENALDO & CLARA.  Those few minutes feature Arlen Roth on guitar with Rambin' Jack Elliot.   

If one isn't immediately familiar with Roth's impressive body of work you should be.  According to Vintage Guitar Magazine, Roth is one of the Top 100 influential guitarists of the 20th Century.  He has played with the likes of: John Prine, Leon Rebone, Paul Simon, Art Garfunkel, Phoebe Snow, Jack Bruce, Pete Seeger, Duane Eddy and Don McLean amongst others.    Roth also taught Ralph Macchio to play the guitar for the 1986 Walter Hill film CROSSROADS--playing against Steve Vai in the films climatic finale.
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Thursday, May 21, 2015

Kim Darby Interview The Strawberry Statement (1970)
PART FOUR:  In this 4-Part interview series actress Kim Darby talks with Justin Bozung for TV STORE ONLINE about her work in such films as DON'T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK (1973), THE STRAWBERRY STATEMENT (1970), THE ONE AND ONLY (1978), and THE GRISSOM GANG (1971).


Bruce Davison The Strawberry Statement (1970)
TV STORE ONLINE:   How did THE STRAWBERRY STATEMENT (1970) come to you?

DARBY:  My agent, Bill Robinson, got me that role.    I was "hot" at that time I guess.  I had done TRUE GRIT (1969)  so I had a window of time from that.    Bill had heard about the picture, and it was written by Israel Horovitz.  It was to be directed by this young director, and the picture was to be his first feature.     I went over to MGM and met with [producer] Irwin Winkler.  I walked in and the first thing I saw was this young blond-haired man leaning up against Irwin's door.   It was Bruce [Davison].  He smiled at me and I went in and met everyone and that was that!
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Wednesday, May 20, 2015
Kim Darby interview

PART THREE:  In this 4-Part interview series actress Kim Darby talks with Justin Bozung for TV STORE ONLINE about her work in such films as DON'T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK (1973), THE STRAWBERRY STATEMENT (1970), THE ONE AND ONLY (1978), and THE GRISSOM GANG (1971).


Kim Darby Henry Winkler The One and Only
TV STORE ONLINE:  I was hoping that we could talk about THE ONE AND ONLY (1978)....

DARBY:  Sure.

TV STORE ONLINE:  It's such a sweet little movie.  You just wanna hold it in your arms and squeeze its little cheeks! (laughing)

DARBY: (laughing)

TV STORE ONLINE: How did that role come to you?  

DARBY:  When THE ONE AND ONLY came to me I hadn't worked in a while.  I was sober, but I just hadn't worked for a long time.  I went in and read for the part of "Mary Crawford" with Carl Reiner.   Carl is one of the angels of the whole world!   It was a comedy, but I didn't want to play it that way.  I just approached her simply, and that made Carl laugh.  I got a call later on that Carl wanted me to come back to read with Henry Winkler.   So I drove over to Mr. Reiner's house, read with Henry, and that was that.
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Thursday, May 14, 2015

Kim Darby interview The Grissom Gang (1971)
PART TWO:  In this 4-Part interview series actress Kim Darby talks with Justin Bozung for TV STORE ONLINE about her work in such films as DON'T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK (1973), THE STRAWBERRY STATEMENT (1970), THE ONE AND ONLY (1978), and THE GRISSOM GANG (1971). 



Kim Darby interview
TV STORE ONLINE:   Can you tell me how you came to work with Robert Aldrich on THE GRISSOM GANG (1971)?

DARBY:  Every actress in town had been up for it.  Michelle Phillips, Barbara Hershey, and quite a few others had tested for it, but Mr. Aldrich didn't think any of them were right for "Barbara Blandish."   My agent at the time, Bill Robinson, had asked me to go in and meet with Mr. Aldrich and his son [William Aldrich].   Mr. Aldrich was just the most wonderful man in the world, and it wasn't until after we had started shooting that he told me about something his son had said to him after I had left his office.   He told me that his son had  said, "You know Dad, I just don't think that she's right for this role."    Wherein Mr. Aldrich preceded to say, "She may not be right, but she'll play the hell out of it."  I really learned a lot from Mr. Aldrich during the shooting of THE GRISSOM GANG, and I think that it's a terrible picture.    But working with Aldrich was the most enjoyable and funny time I ever had.  There was nothing like it.
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Wednesday, May 13, 2015
Kim Darby interview Don't Be Afraid of the Dark

PART ONE:  In this 4-Part interview series actress Kim Darby talks with Justin Bozung for TV STORE ONLINE about her work in such films as DON'T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK (1973), THE STRAWBERRY STATEMENT (1970), THE ONE AND ONLY (1978), and THE GRISSOM GANG (1971).  


Kim Darby Don't Be Afraid of the Dark
TV STORE ONLINE:   Tell me about how you came to star in DON'T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK (1973)?

DARBY:  I was just offered the part.  I am so fat in that movie!  When I was cast in DON'T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK I had come off of eighteen-years of  amphetamines.  I had been sober for only two weeks.  I could barely hold my head up--but my work is very good.

TV STORE ONLINE:  It's an incredible performance. It was also the first time in your career were you had to carry an entire film on your shoulders...

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Thursday, May 7, 2015

Bill Richmond interview

PART TWO: Three time Emmy-winning comedy writer Bill Richmond talks with Justin Bozung for TV STORE ONLINE about his start with Frank Sinatra, working with Jerry Lewis as his writing partner on such films as THE NUTTY PROFESSOR, THE LADIES' MAN and THE PATSY as well as his work on such classic television series as Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, The Carol Burnett Show, Three's Company and Welcome Back, Kotter.

PART ONE of this interview is here.

Bill Richmond Emmy winner writer
TV STORE ONLINE:   Going back to THE LADIES' MAN, could you talk about the size and scope of that film's set?  The dollhouse?

BILL RICHMOND:     Sure. It was incredibly interesting.   That set was three stories high, and about fifty yards wide or so.    And it's premise was based on the Hollywood Studio Club, which was an actual place in Hollywood where up and coming starlets would live at when they came to town.  Jerry's idea was that he could move his camera around  room-to-room when it was on a crane.     Each room was individually lit and wired for sound.      

It was a busy set.   Everywhere you went on the Paramount lot, you'd see signs outside of sound stages that read, "NO ADMITTANCE." But Jerry's set was different.  He put up a sign that said, "Sure, c'mon on in."    He even put bleachers in, so visitors could come in and watch the shoot.   That was copied in this town, you know.  Universal Studios has that now.

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Tuesday, May 5, 2015

Bill Richmond comedy writer interview
PART ONE: Three time Emmy-winning comedy writer Bill Richmond talks with Justin Bozung for TV STORE ONLINE about his start with Frank Sinatra, working with Jerry Lewis as his writing partner on such films as THE NUTTY PROFESSOR, THE LADIES' MAN and THE PATSY as well as his work on such classic television series as Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, The Carol Burnett Show, Three's Company and Welcome Back, Kotter.

PART TWO of this interview is here.
Bill Richmond Jerry Lewis
Jerry Lewis & Bill Richmond 1968
Photo Courtesy: Bill Richmond
What you don't know about the career of comedy writer Bill Richmond could fill the Grand Canyon many times over.   When you begin to research the work of a man that has been working in film and television for over fifty years--it becomes a bit overwhelming. It would be like if one tried to ingest the eye of the storm while sitting smack in the center of a comedy tornado. Bill Richmond is a force of comedy nature, and to call this three time Emmy winner prolific--would be a major understatement. Even after his retirement from the industry ten years ago in 1995 at the age of 74 years old.

So where does one began when looking back at the career of a comedy god?  Do you start at his birth? His earlier days coming-of-age in Illinois? Or do you start with his work co-writing such classic films as THE NUTTY PROFESSOR (1963) or THE LADIES' MAN (1961) with his former writing partner Jerry Lewis?     Maybe you first examine his years writing on the greatest sketch comedy series in the history of television, The Carol Burnett Show?   Or maybe you start with his time pulling double duties as producer and lead writer on the television series Welcome Back, Kotter?

The career of Bill Richmond becomes even more of a whirlwind in your mind when you step back and realize that when he first started writing movies and television sitcoms back in 1960 he had already had two careers before the fact.
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Thursday, April 30, 2015

Robert Boris Interview

PART TWO:   Writer / Director Robert Boris talks with Justin Bozung for TV STORE ONLINE about his screenplay for DOCTOR DETROIT, almost writing 48 HOURS as well as his work with Richard Pryor on SOME KIND OF HERO...

PART ONE of this interview can be read HERE.

Robert Boris screenwriter
TV STORE ONLINE:  Can we get into DOCTOR DETROIT (1983)?  I know there were three screenwriters that worked on the screenplay for that film...Did you originate the story and where did Carl Gottlieb jump onto the project?

BORIS:  I didn't start it.  I had done SOME KIND OF HERO (1982) with Richard Pryor, Howard Koch, and Michael Pressman before DOCTOR DETROIT.  After SOME KIND OF HERO I was contacted and asked to work on 48 HOURS (1982) at Paramount.  The studio had asked me to come in and it was around the time that the writers' strike was looming.  They just wanted me to do a polish on it, and just before I was about to start that--Michael Pressman contacted me and asked me to read Bruce Jay Friedman's original script for DOCTOR DETROIT.  The original script was kind of convoluted, and Dan Aykroyd's character wasn't yet a college professor. It was a crazy comedy that wasn't quite together yet, but it was really interesting. 

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